Failure and Success

Some of the greatest people,

Are the ones, who have faced failure and pushed on anyway,

They seem to look on the bright side and continue to move forward,

Facing their obstacles with barren simplicity.

They can walk with humility and confidence within the same stride,

And this is the kind of success to which I abide,

For perhaps the highest achievements in life,

Come from greatest hardships,

Recognising that either way we win,

For the next step is always available,

But what we do with it,

Is only up to us.

22-8-14

I refuse to accept defeat unless this is for my benefit. Even when I fail, I always try to see it as training for the next attempt, or preparation for the new direction that I am taking. This attitude isn’t always easy, but it is possible.

Tonight I watched an inspiring TED talk that spoke straight to my heart (the amazing story of Sam Berns, a teenager who has lived through the premature aging condition of “progeria”, and talks openly about his philosophy for a happy life – well worth the watch if you can spare 12:45 minutes) –  his story reminded me of a philosophy that has guided me through many difficult times.

 

So many times throughout the journey of PhD I faced failure. The “feeling of failure” seemed to come up repeatedly;- when studies were not approved to be carried out, or when help seemed like it was far away, when journals rejected preliminary submissions, and when I had to complete a thesis that seemed like it was against the odds. However, I made it through all of these things, securing 3 scientific publications in a peer reviewed journals, 1 book chapter, and a completed PhD thesis of 363 pages long. When I submitted my thesis in January this year it was late, requiring more than one extension, but still I delivered the goods.

Recently I heard back from the Australian National University, and that the thesis had been accepted for the degree, pending some minor revisions. It was a powerful moment for me to read their reports that indicated that the thesis was worthy of the degree to which I was submitting it towards, but the ideas contained within were likely to make a difference in the world, particular in rural areas of the developing world. This was already a dream come true.

To make a difference through research was something I kept close to my heart all the time when I was conducting studies and writing up the thesis, which took me through some lonely but also inspiring periods. The gratitude I feel for all the help I’ve received cannot be expressed in words alone (although I tried in this post years ago) – and this is why I created a short film about the experience some years back.

However, now that I am almost there, it is clear to me that I needed to go through all that I went through to arrive here– for I believe the “journey” is what makes the destination worthwhile.

This concept inspires me for the next journey, and I hope it will be as good as the last one. Even if I have to again face failure and overcome obstacles in order to move forward, I accept this wholeheartedly, knowing this what I have chosen to do and will appreciate it accordingly.

Thank you for being there!

For all of you out there, who are walking down towards a vision of success may all your dreams come true  – after all as a wise friend once said to me “perhaps the only failure is the failure to try”

🙂

Ps I don’t think I’m alone in this philosophy, for many others seemed to have had a few obstacles along their inspirational paths.

Developing EM – Brazil 2014

 

I really wanted to help out with the DevelopingEM conference because of the great philosophy behind this international educational collaboration.
 
Lee Fineberg and Mark Newcombe, are both Emergency Physicians (EP’s) with whom I work, are passionate about the international developing of the EM specialty, and have been working on the DevelopingEM conferences for years.
 
Three things that I have away about the “DevelopingEM” conferences from research I’ve done on the topic, and the recent interview that I conducted include that ;-

 

1) this conference is not about about being flashy, but rather it is about “walking the talk” 
 

 

2) it is about sustainable development of the speciality of Emergency Medicine, and 

 

 
3) it is about respecting, honoring, and supporting the existing local structures in EM training  (throughout my experience of 4 years of conducting research in Sri Lanka – whilst also supporting EM developing – this is a key strategy that can so easy be missed or overlooked)

 

Finally they also have a plan to repeat these conference through the same regions in a 4 year cycle – ie the conference structure is set to be sustainable, and one that we can all build upon. 

 

 
Natalie Thurtle is a past conference delegate who is also committed to the cause of developing the speciality of EM globally. She is also someone who I have worked with in the past, and someone who has herself conducted some amazing work through MSF involving the management of environmental poisoning epidemics in Central Africa. 
 
Her recent blog post highlights some of the unique aspects of the Developing EM conferernce from here perspective. Below is an excerpt (but the entire article is a good read);- 

 

 

“Many conferences focus on the practice of medicine in an ideal fully equipped setting with the assumption that practice is scientific. For me, recognising and understanding the political and inexact nature of health care provision – inequality of access, inequality of standard of care and the undue influence of corporate needs on research and guidelines, as well as pragmatism in the face of limited evidence, limited expertise or limited resources and our own fallibility – is a critical part of being a real physician.”

 

 

I hope the video and link offers you some informative and interesting information! 
 

 

Peace out
Bishan