Home » Uncategorized » The perils of hidden sugar content: interview with Dr Aseem Malhotra and filmmaker Damon Gameau

The perils of hidden sugar content: interview with Dr Aseem Malhotra and filmmaker Damon Gameau

I recently watched an intriguing Lateline interview that was with a UK Cardiologist called Dr Aseem Malhotra who is leading a public health driven movement to raise awarness about the perils of sugar that is often hidden from us by the food industry. The following interview shared below is between the BCC reporter, Dr Malhotra and the filmmaker of hit documentary “That sugar Film” Damon Gameau. They present data and illustrations of some key points about the food that we eat, that everyone should be aware of;-

This eye-opening interview highlights the perils of sugar contained in common foods (often marketed as healthy foods).

http://doctoraseem.com/time-bring-back-fat/

It is worth reading the article in full and and also watching the YouTube video of the interview, but in brief the closing key points by the Dr Malhotra the health promoting Cardiologist were;-

  • Eat real foods
  • Avoid processed foods
  • Limit yourself to no more than 6 teaspoons per day
  • Eat full fat yoghurt rather than fat freee
  • Having more fat from foods like olive and nuts – reduces risk of many chronic diseases of heart

Also – the salient message

  • Beware of common foods that have hidden sugar content
  • Eg. 1 tablespoon of BBQ sauce has 2 sugars

This article particlarly strikes a chord with me because it highlights the power of preventative health (and in particular health promotion) and knowledge translation used in synchrony, an intersection that is perhaps going to be one of the best way to tackle many different deeply ingrained habits of modern society that are leading to preventable ill health.

The bridge between “treatment” and “prevention”

During my last 10 years of working as a doctor, I have been repeatedly lead to the interest space that lies between the treatment and preventative spheres of health care. In the process of carrying out fieldwork between 2006 and 2010, and writing up a PhD thesis to do with knowledge translation addressing suicide related death prevention in pesticide self poisoning, I became further aware of the integral roles that both preventative health and knowledge translation of existing evidence have in making an impact in the promotion of health at a global level.

After returning to the Australasian health system 5 years ago, to complete my specialist training in Emergency Medicine, I could clearly see one of the most important gaps between treatment driven medicine and preventative medicine was the lack of a “two-way street” between these two worlds of preventative health (or health promotion) and treatment driven specialist medicine. In some cases the connection between these two worlds seemed more like a like a “bridge” between two very separate islands. It is easy to understand why the gap exists because often in the hustle bustle of a busy Emergency Department, treatment is clearly the focus, and there is very little opportunity to address the problems that have lead people turning up to hospital in the first palce. However, the importance of bridging this gap, and enhancing innovative traffic on this two way street seems to be increasingly important if we are to reduce the overall cost and burden on our emerging health systems.

Public Health innitiatives using media as a vehicle

Health promotion is a complex arena of work that will require engagement of multiple players in the arena of health including funders, governments, health workers, and of course the public themselves (ie the stakeholders for preventative health innitiatives). The health promotion work being done either directly or inadvertently both by award-winning Cardiologist Dr Malhotra and Filmmaker Damon Gameau educating the public on the hidden perils of sugar is quite inspirational, and to me it illustrates useful model of how the intersecting modalities of science and cinamatographic art are being  employed in a goal of improving global health.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s