Emergency medicine, and the loophole of love!

the loophole of love

With love we rise above,
Like the angel to the dove,
That flies high in the sky,

Above the the question of “why?”,
This should happen, or that should happen,
Instead taking “acceptance” as the key,

For only then will we be free,
From the visitudes of life,
For these are the ones that give it the spice,

Like a curry to its rice,
Remembering that there is no price,
In dreaming away,

So forget what “they” might say,
Because inside we can continue to pray,
For the gift of smiling yet another day,

And loving the present moment,

For in the end,
It’s all we have.

9-5-15

I recently started a new rotation of Emergency Medicine training, and before long have found myself immersed in all it’s beauty and simultaneous horror. Our speciality is full of energy, love and frustration. There are good days and challenging days, magic moments and equally frustrating ones, often intertwined into the same 10 hour shift, if not the same hour.

Most days are heavily mixed with both energies which makes it hard to have a frame of reference for an answer when someone from outside this world asks, “so how was your shift?”. For me, it is perhaps most truthful to answer this question with a guitar in hand. An example of this is provided with the the song titled “in the night drift”, that I have included at the end of this post.

Often the pressures within a single shift are high, but when compounded within a persons training period, or across sections of their career span, it is understandable that a soul searching doubt can easily set in, to the point where the question of “why am I doing this again?” is asked.

I am sure that this question gets asked by many in the field, perhaps with haunting frequency, regardless of whether one is a nurse, doctor or any of the multitude of other health “carers”.

Doctors, nurses, and the many other important ones

Whilst most would argue that “doctors and nurses” are at the core of health care provision, there is an array of other people, who occupy either named professions or unnamed roles. These people often contribute under the radar of recognition, but are making a huge difference in the field of emergency medicine everyday.

The list, in no particular order, includes but is not limited to;- physiotherapists, radiographers, clerical staff, nurse aids, cleaners, porters, special care assistants, pharmacists, translators, administrators, radiographers, laboratory staff, parking attendants, building engineers, ambulance and police staff, public health workers, aged care workers, counsellors and social workers, and not least the patients themselves and their families. We are all one, interacting together, in the common milieu of a single shift on the emergency medicine shop floor (a term that is often used to encompass the Emergency Department by Emergency Physicians in Australasia).

Why we practice emergency medicine?

Regardless of whether one is a doctor or has one of the many other important roles in this arena, perhaps Mel Helbert puts forward one of the best expositions of why someone would consider undertaking a career in emergency medicine in his recent talk titled from the EM essentials conference titled “why we practice emergency medicine”.

Mel, is the creator/founder of the EM Rap education channel, is a champion in emergency medicine education. When I use this term I mean it both literally, but I also mean to use it as a term from the field of “knowledge translation“, used to describe those who are proponents of change, in the evolving culture of crossing the “know-do” gap.

Whilst everyone’s story is interesting in their own unique way, Mel seems to have captured with his unashamedly honest exposition something that reaches out and inspires his audience, no matter if you love it or hate it, are within or outside the profession, or are simply curious about why anyone would want to do this job.

It was a really interesting 15 mins so I thought I’d share it here – thanks Mel!

The night shift

 
As promised, this is a song called “in the night drift” that I recorded directly after surviving busy nightshift, when I crawled back to my hospital accommodation and had a much needed sleep (albeit after a date with my guitar!). Enjoy 🙂

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Believe in Yourself!

This is the message that came from the words that better describes the song that I just recorded. that I originally called “study jam”. As I pushed record on my computer I entered the words “study jam” because that was exactly what it was – some random chords and sounds that needed to be released quickly before heading to the office on a beautiful sunday to do some work.

Today I need to re-analyse data that collected in 2008 to try an answer a question related to understand what drives doctors to make clincial decisions. I never dreamed that I would still be doing this in March 2013.I am afraid of doing this data analysis which is why I needed to start with some inspiration.

Research and writing can be a lonely world, but I believe it is rewarding in the end. One of the reasons it’s so lonely is that I feel that very few people can understand what you’re talking about half the time, but still I try to explain. The reason I feel fear is that analysing data is not straightforward, and it usually take far longer than one imagines. I am also afraid becuase if what comes out of this analysis changes my findings, then i have to re-think the problem again and write about it in a different way (ie. “back to the drawing board”, yet again!)

“Why am I doing this?” is the question that comes to mind a hundred times over, but it’s already been answered a thousand times back. I had a dream in 2008, when working in the rural hospitals of Sri Lanka, of making a difference to the systems medical education in low resource settings. The research I was involved with opened so many doors, in my mind, mainly to do with understanding how making a change could be possible. However, not long after I had the vision, came a realisation that it would take a lot of time and committment and perserverance to make it all happen. These were all things that frightend the life out of me at the time, but I ignored it with enthusiam and a belief that it would be a breeze. Only much later when facing many road blocks I had to face the reality that writing up my research findings was going to be harder than I had hoped for.

Whilst I don’t expect many to understand the details of what I’m writing about, there is one concept my struggle, and occasional loneliness illustrates:-

“it is not easy for anyone to understand (and therefore judge) anyone elses struggles, no matter how trivial or signigficant they seem on the surface.”

This is why I try to maintain a deep respect for “all” human being because the chances are that I don’t fully know or understand their struggle. I believe the common suffering is the thing that binds as all, and it is something that we can embrace. Buddhist philosophy suggests that the struggle is common, and perhaps solution can be shared by all.

But what about the conditions – aren’t some people put in far more tricky situations?

Perhaps? Perhaps not? I the only thing I know is that I don’t know.

Again, I don’t profess to know about anyone else, after all i’m just getting to know myself!

I believe that the conditions of one’s external reality (ie what’s going on in your life) can really shape and affect our inner world, but only as much as we let it. It’s hard to change the external world quickly (or at all), but what we can do is change our “realtionship with that reality” at any given time through our “attitude”. Holding an attitude of hope, positivity, and friendliness, allows us to see pick up wth most import data points in the experience soup that hits our face on a daily basis.

This morning when I went out surfing the rough seas, with 4 friends, it looked like madness, but we did it with an open mind, and the result was amazing. We didn’t catch the best waves of our life, but we all had a fun time, and learned something. Ultimately isn’t this a valuable thing – this is my definition (at the moment) of what life is about – to learn something and try and have some fun in the process, and even better to share it with some others!

I hope you have a good Sunday whereever you are, no matter what the conditions.

My song has provided me with enough fun and inspiration to allow me to go and face the fears of the analysis in the office.

Adios Amigos!

ps I hope you enjoy the song!

Bish_and_boyz-sufing

(Photography courtesy of Kester Boardman)